Wednesday, June 10, 2020

World's famous Mosques

World's Famous Mosque

In Islam Mosques are the religious center of Muslims. The Mosque is the main place for faith lifting. Muslims conduct their prayers, hold the Friday Khutbah (congregational sermon), Ramadan night prayers, etc.there are some famous and beautiful Mosques-

1- Al Haram Mosque,Mecca Saudi Arabia- 



 The Al Haram mosque is one of the world's famous and beautiful mosques. also called HaramMosquemosque in MeccaSaudi Arabia, built to enclose the Ka╩┐bah, the holiest shrine in Islam. As one of the destinations of the hajj and umra pilgrimages, it receives millions of worshippers each year. The oldest parts of the modern structure date to the 16th century. Masjid al-Haram was built around the Kaaba. It is also the largest mosque in the world. It was first built under the leadership of the Caliph Omar Ibn al-Khattab (634-644) and has been modified continuously under several Muslim rulers. Omar, the first Caliph, ordered the demolition of some houses surrounding the Kaaba in order to accommodate the growing number of pilgrims and built a 1.5 meter high wall to delineate a large prayer area. During the reign of his successor Caliph Uthman Ibn Affan (644-656), the prayer space was enlarged and was covered with a roof carried on wooden columns and arches. In 692, after Caliph Abdul Malik bin Marwan conquered Mecca from Ibn Zubayr, the guardian of the holy site, the outer walls of the mosque were raised, the ceiling was covered with teak and the column capitals were painted in gold. 

2- Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, Abu dhabi

                     


The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque stands out as one of the world’s largest mosques, and the only one that captures unique interactions between Islam and world cultures. Sheikh Zayed's vision for the Grand Mosque was to incorporate architectural styles from different Muslim civilizations and celebrate cultural diversity by creating a haven that is truly diverse and inspirational in its foundation. The mosque’s architects were British, Italian and Emirati, and design inspiration was borrowed parts of Turkey, Morocco, Pakistan, and Egypt among other Islamic countries, revealing a glistening architectural marvel with an astonishing capacity of 40,000 worshippers and visitors


3- The Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey-

                   

The Blue Mosque (Called Sultanahmet Camii in Turkish) is an historical mosque in Istanbul. The mosque is known as the Blue Mosque because of blue tiles surrounding the walls of interior design.Mosque was built between 1609 and 1616 years, during the rule of Ahmed I. just like many other mosques, it also comprises a tomb of the founder, a madrasa and a hospice.Besides still used as a mosque, the Sultan Ahmed Mosque has also become a popular tourist attraction in Istanbul.
Besides being tourist attraction, it's also a active mosque, so it's closed to non worshippers for a half hour or so during the five daily prayers.

4- Crystal Mosque, Terengganu Malaysia-


There are many mosques in Malaysia due to Islam being the official religion. However, one of the most, if not the most, unique mosque in this country is the Crystal Mosque. The uniqueness of this mosque has made it one of the most popular tourist attractions in Malaysia. The mosque is located in the Islamic Heritage Park in Wan Man Island off Terengganu. The mosque took two years to be built from 2006 until 2008 and was only opened to the public on 8th February 2008 by the 13th Yang di-Pertuan Agong, Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin of Terengganu.The uniqueness of the mosque comes from its interesting exterior. The mosque is coated with steel, glass and crystal which are the three main materials in the development of this magnificent piece of architecture which gave it its name. Its sleek and modern look is reflected off the river surrounding the mosque. The illumination from inside the mosque also makes it look like the glass domes are shining. The Crystal Mosque is able to accommodate up to 1,500 worshippers at a given time and also made its name internationally for its beauty.

5- Qol sharif Mosque, Kazan, Russia-



In the 16th Century prior to the invasion of Kazan a mosque stood here which was named after its leading teacher Qol Sharif. Qol Sharif died alongside his students trying to save the mosque from the Tsar’s forces, but unfortunately it was destroyed in 1522 and for centuries the site remained empty. Following the fall of the Soviet Union, with the help of many other counties including Saudi Arabia and UAE, the mosque was rebuilt, albeit in a modern style. The impressive new mosque was finally inaugurated in 2005 when Kazan celebrated its millennium and now stands as a prominent symbol of the city, rightly recognised as one of Kazan’s most worthy sights as well as Europe’s largest mosque. The Qol Sharif largely functions as a museum although thousands of Muslims do gather here to pray on major religious holidays.

6- Badshahi Mosque, Lahore pakistan-



Badshahi mosque is one of the few significant architectural monuments built during Emperor Aurangzeb's long rule from 1658 to 1707. It is presently the fifth largest mosque in the world and was indisputably the largest mosque in the world from 1673 to 1986 when the Faisal Mosque was constructed in Islamabad. Although it was built late in the Mughal era in a period of relative decline, its beauty, elegance, and scale epitomize Mughal cultural achievement like no other monument in Lahore.

Construction of the mosque began in 1671 under the direction of Muzaffar Hussain (Fida'i Khan Koka), Aurangzeb's brother-in-law and the governor of Lahore. It was originally planned as a reliquary to safeguard a strand of the Prophet's hair. Its grand scale is influenced by the Jama Mosque of Delhi which had been built by Aurangzeb's father Shah Jahan. The plan of Badshahi mosque is essentially a square measuring 170 meters on each side. Since the north end of the mosque was built along the edge of the Ravi river, it was not possible to install a north gate like the one used in the Jama Mosque, and a south gate was also not constructed in order to maintain the overall symmetry. Within the courtyard, the prayer hall features four minarets that echo in minature the four minarets at each corner of the mosque's perimeter.


7- Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin Mosque, Brurei-



SULTAN OMAR ALI SAIFUDDIN MOSQUE is a an exclamation point above the Brunei River, and the so-called village in the water, Kampong Ayer. Built on an artificial lagoon on the banks of the river, the mosque initially seems more attraction than place of worship. However, this could not be farthest from the truth, and the grandiose mosque was in fact designed solely for prayer to Allah.From around Bandar Seri Begawan, the capital of Brunei, the golden topped dome of the mosque shines in the night sky. Although its population is only 400,000, 2/3 of the population of Brunei adhere to Islam, laws are based on Sharia. The country is extremely proud of its Muslim population, and the golden mosque was built to honor this section of the country. At a cost of around 5 million USD, the Bruneian Sultan spared no expense: imported Italian marble pillars and floor, granite from Shanghai, crystal chandeliers from England, ornate carpets from Saudi Arabia and a main dome of pure gold.

8- Dome of the Rock Mosque, jerusalem, palestine-



Arabic QUBBAT AS-SAKHRAH, also erroneously referred to as the MOSQUE OF OMAR, this shrine in Jerusalem is the oldest extant Islamic monument. The rock over which the shrine was built is sacred to both Muslims and Jews. The Prophet Muhammad, founder of Islam, is traditionally believed to have ascended into heaven from the site. In Jewish tradition, it is here that Abraham, the progenitor and first patriarch of the Hebrew people, is said to have prepared to sacrifice his son Isaac. The Dome and Al-Aqsa Mosque are both located on the Temple Mount, the site of Solomon's Temple and its successors.

The Dome of the Rock was built between AD 685 and 691 by the caliph 'Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan, not as a mosque for public worship but rather as a mashhad, a shrine for pilgrims. It is virtually the first monumental building in Islamic history and is of considerable aesthetic and architectural importance; it is rich with mosaic, faience, and marble, much of which was added several centuries after its completion. Basically octagonal, the Dome of the Rock is more typically Roman or Byzantine than Islamic. A wooden dome--approximately 60 feet (18 m) in diameter and mounted on an elevated drum--rises above a circle of 16 piers and columns. Surrounding this circle is an octagonal arcade of 24 piers and columns. The outer walls repeat this octagon, each of the eight sides being approximately 60 feet (18 m) wide and 36 feet (11 m) high. Both the dome and the exterior walls contain many windows.


No comments:

Post a Comment

Umrah

What is Umrah In Arabic, the word Umrah is derived from I'timaar which means a visit. However, Umrah in islamic terminology, means payi...